2010 Chevrolet Traverse LS FWD

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2010 Chevrolet Traverse LS FWD http://ow.ly/a8gb30g4NFY

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Make Your Car Last 200,00 Miles

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Not long ago, to keep a car running beyond the 200,000-mile mark would have seemed about as likely as driving it to the moon. But big improvements in power-train technology, rust prevention, lubricants, and more have led to game changing improvements in reliability and durability. Now, almost any car can make it well into six-figure territory with proper care.  

That is good news for drivers, who are keeping their cars longer than ever before; the average age of all cars on the road is more than 11 years, up from about eight years in 1995, according to Polk research. Still, motorists might not realize the long-term financial benefits of keeping a car for 200,000 miles. Our research shows that reaching that milestone (which would take the average motorist about 15 years) could result in savings of $30,000 or more.

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TPMS Sensor

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The purpose of the TPMS (Tire Pressure Monitoring System) is to alert you when tire pressure is too low and could to create unsafe driving conditions. If the light is illuminated, it means your tires could be underinflated, which can lead to undue tire wear and possible tire failure. It’s important to understand the importance of proper tire inflation, and how TPMS can help you maintain your tires.

Maintaining proper tire inflation is essential to vehicle handling, overall tire performance, and load carrying capability. A properly inflated tire will reduce tread movement, reduce rolling resistance, and increase water dispersion. Reduced tread movement gives the tire a longer tread life. Reduced rolling resistance, the force required to roll a loaded tire, results in increased fuel efficiency. Increased water dispersion decreases the possibility of hydroplaning.

Both overinflation and underinflation can cause premature treadwear and possible tire failure. Overinflation can result in decreased traction, premature wear, and the inability to absorb road impact. Overinflated tires will show premature wear in the center of the tread. On the other hand, underinflation will cause sluggish tire respose, decreased fuel economy, excessive heat buildup, and tire overload. An underinflated tire will show premature wear on both outside shoulders.

The TPMS warning light will help warn you when your tire pressure is too low. Your TPMS has various illumination patterns that mean different things. Keep reading to find out what they mean.

If you’re learning about tire pressure sensors for the first time, finding the TPMS indicator on your dashboard is simple. It’s a horseshoe-shaped light with an exclamation point in the center.

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